Political Support for National and International Public Research

  • Hemchandra Gajbhiye
  • Don F. Hadwiger
Part of the Policy Studies Organization Series book series (PSOS)

Abstract

Adequate food for the world’s population over the next two decades requires an increase in production of 3 to 4 per cent a year in most developing countries and an average increase in yield on already cropped lands of no less than 2 per cent yearly (World Bank, 1981). Increases in productivity in the past 100 years have come largely from the application of science-based farm technology and from changes in management and inputs developed through organized research. Because most countries are now running out of good agricultural land, it is essential that agricultural research generates new technology that will permit higher yielding crops and livestock production if malnutrition is to be reduced, increased food costs are to be avoided, and economic growth not threatened.

Keywords

Migration Income Assure Boulder Alan 

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Copyright information

© Policy Studies Organization 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hemchandra Gajbhiye
  • Don F. Hadwiger

There are no affiliations available

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