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Peronist Economic Policies, 1946–55

  • Pablo Gerchunoff
  • Carlos Díaz Alejandro
Part of the St Antony’s/Macmillan Series book series

Abstract

Most works published on the economic policies of the first Peronist government have described those policies as an expression of a deliberate and conscious alliance among social sectors, or as a coalition between the State and the trade unions — for some this also included the military. Their consequence was an inefficient assignment of resources, which led to the clear and systematic bias against exporting which has existed in the Argentine economy since the end of the Second World War.

Keywords

Trade Union Real Wage Real Interest Rate Trade Balance Relative Prex 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    C. F. Díaz Alejandro, Essays on the Economic History of the Argentine Republic (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1970).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    R. Prebisch, ‘Informe preliminar acerca de la situación económica’, in Banco Central de la República Argentina, Memoria Anual (Buenos Aires, 1955).Google Scholar
  3. 4.
    Banco Central de la República Argentina, Memoria Anual (Buenos Aires, 1949).Google Scholar
  4. 6.
    D. Cavallo and A. Peña, ‘Déficit fiscal, endeudamiento del gobierno y tasa de inflación: Argentina 1940–1982’, Estudios, no. 26, April–June 1983.Google Scholar

Notes

  1. 1.
    Sources for these data may be found in Carlos F. Díaz Alejandro, ‘No Less than One Hundred Years of Argentine Economic History Plus Some Comparisons’, in Gustavo Ranis et al. (eds), Comparative Development Perspectives: Essays in Honor of Lloyd G. Reynolds (Boulder, Col.: Westview Press, 1984) p. 347.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    This is part of the 1953 advice General Perón gave Carlos Ibáñez, then President of Chile. See Albert O. Hirschman, ‘The Turn to Authoritarianism in Latin America and the Search for its Economic Determinants’, in David Collier (ed.), The New Authoritarianism in Latin America (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1979) p. 65.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    A pioneer work in this area is Hugh H. Schwartz, ‘The Argentine Experience with Industrial Credit and Protection Incentives, 1943–1958’, Ph.D. thesis, 1967, Yale University.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Guido di Tella and Rudiger Dornbusch 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pablo Gerchunoff
  • Carlos Díaz Alejandro

There are no affiliations available

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