Nursing care of the patient who is out of touch with reality

  • Peggy Martin
Chapter

Abstract

The person who is out of touch with reality may feel estranged from the real world and from himself. He may find it hard to differentiate between what is real and what is not. He may feel that he himself has changed or that his environment is different in some way. He is often a person who is isolated, lonely and misunderstood by others; in his formative years, he may have experienced difficult relationships with his parents.

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References and Further Reading

References

  1. Arieti, S. (1972), cited by Field, W. E. (1985), Hearing voices, Journal of Psychosocial Nursing, 23, No. 1, 9–14.Google Scholar
  2. Cook, J. C. (1971), Interpreting and decoding autistic communication, Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 9, No. 1, 25–28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Field, W. E. (1985), Hearing voices, Journal of Psychosocial Nursing, 23, No. 1, 9–14.Google Scholar
  4. Roy, C. (1980), The Roy adaptation model. In: Conceptual Models for Nursing Practice (eds Riehl, J. P., and Roy, C.), Appleton Century Crofts, Norwalk, Connecticut.Google Scholar
  5. Schwartzman, S. T. (1975), The hallucinating patient and nursing intervention, Journal of Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health Services, 14, No. 6, 23–28, 33–36.Google Scholar

Further reading

  1. Field, W., and Ruelke, W. (1973), Hallucinations and how to deal with them, American Journal of Nursing, 73, 638–640.Google Scholar
  2. Gerder, C., and Snyder, D. (1970), Language and thought, Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 8, No. 5, 230–233.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Grace, H. K., and Camilleri, D. (1981), Mental Health Nursing: A Socio-psychological Approach, Wm. C. Brown, Dubuque, Iowa.Google Scholar
  4. Gravenkemper, K. H. (1963), In: Hallucinations in Some Clinical Approaches to Psychiatric Nursing (eds Burd, S. F., and Marshall, M. A.), Macmillan, New York.Google Scholar
  5. Grosicki, J. P., and Harmonson, M. (1969), Nursing action guide: hallucinations, Journal of Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health Services, 7, No. 3, 133–135.Google Scholar
  6. Horne, M. (1985), A word in your head, Nursing Mirror, 160, No. 23, 34–35.Google Scholar
  7. Hurteau, M. P. (1963), Disguised language: a clinical nursing problem. In: Some Clinical Approaches to Psychiatric Nursing (eds Burd, S. F., and Marshall, M. A.), Macmillan, New York.Google Scholar
  8. Kroah, J. (1974), Strategies for interviewing in language and thought disorders, Journal of Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health Services, 12, No. 2, 3–9.Google Scholar
  9. Milverton, R. (1985), Institutional neurosis among clients living in the parental home, Community Psychiatric Nursing Journal, 5, No. 1, 11–13.Google Scholar
  10. Pope, B. (1986), Social Skills Training for Psychiatric Nurses, Harper and Row, London.Google Scholar
  11. Sugden, J., and Field, R. (1985), Cognitive and thought disorders, Nursing (UK), 2, No. 34, 999–1003.Google Scholar
  12. Teasdale, K. (1986), Schizophrenia and the family, Nursing Times, 82, No. 7, 41–43.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Peggy Martin and the Individual Contributors 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peggy Martin

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