Dylan Thomas and Wales: the Love—Hate Relationship

  • Linden Peach
Part of the Macmillan Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature book series

Abstract

At the age of forty-seven, six years before his death, Dylan Thomas gave the following account of himself: ‘One: I am a Welshman; two: I am a drunkard; three: I am a lover of the human race, especially of women.’ Although Thomas put his Welshness first, his relationship with Wales was as enigmatic, and as problematic, as his relationships with women. This together with Thomas’s English upbringing has made defining, and accounting for, what it is that can be called Welsh in his work very difficult.

Keywords

Expense Dock Verse Cobble Hate 

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Notes

  1. 2.
    Paul Ferris, Dylan Thoas (1977; rpt. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1978) p. 1.Google Scholar
  2. 5.
    Walford Davies, Dylan Thomas (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1972) p. 4.Google Scholar
  3. 6.
    Jacob Korg, ‘Dylan Thomas’s ’18 Poems’’, Accent (Winter, 1957) 315.Google Scholar
  4. 7.
    Tecwyn Lloyd, ‘Welsh Public Opinion and the First World War’, Planet 10 (Feb./Mar. 1972) 25–37.Google Scholar
  5. 9.
    Margaret Drabble, A Writer’s Britain: Landscape in Literature (London: Book Club Associates, 1979) p. 7.Google Scholar
  6. 10.
    Bobi Jones, ‘Anglo-Welsh: More Definition’, Planet 16 (Feb./Mar. 1973) 14.Google Scholar
  7. 12.
    Ned Thomas, ‘Education in Wales’ in Education in Great Britain and Ireland eds Bell, R., Fowler, G, and Little, K. (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1973) p. 14.Google Scholar
  8. 16.
    R. S. Thomas, ‘The Creative Writer’s Suicide’, Planet, 41 (1978) 31–2.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Linden Peach 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linden Peach
    • 1
  1. 1.Goldsmiths’ CollegeUniversity of LondonUK

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