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Understanding Central Pattern Generators: Insights Gained from the Study of Invertebrate Systems

  • Peter A. Getting
Part of the Wenner-Gren Center International Symposium Series book series (WGS)

Abstract

Any discussion of the neurobiology of vertebrate locomotion would be remiss without some mention of the contribution made by the study of invertebrates. After all the problems of locomotion (pattern generation, spatial and temporal coordination, and sensory modulation) are common to both groups. Perhaps similar neural mechanisms have evolved to cope with these common conditions. Certainly there is ample evidence in both groups that the generation of rhythmic neural activity underlying cyclic locomotor patterns can be attributed to “central pattern generator” (CPG) networks (Delcomyn, 1980). If we are to understand how locomotor patterns are generated and controlled a necessary step will be to understand how CPG networks produce spatially and temporally coordinated activity. In particular what are the cellular and synaptic mechanisms involved in motor pattern generation?

Keywords

Motor Pattern Central Pattern Generator Intracellular Recording Rhythmic Movement Cellular Property 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© The Wenner-Gren Center 1986

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  • Peter A. Getting

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