The Theory of Political Succession

  • Peter Calvert

Abstract

The problem of ensuring orderly political succession has been a matter of concern for political thinkers for many hundreds of years. The main concern of the authors of constitutions has been to structure power in such a way that an orderly succession can be established and maintained. It is the conventional wisdom, at a time when the vast majority of newly independent states have already abandoned the structures with which they entered independence, to suggest that such efforts are vain.

Keywords

Europe Sine Argentina Defend Nigeria 

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Notes

  1. 1.
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Copyright information

© Peter Calvert 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Calvert

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