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Laterality and Unconscious Processes

  • Nathan Brody
Part of the Wenner-Gren Center International Symposium Series book series (WGS)

Abstract

In recent years psychologists have studied the effects of subliminal stimuli on cognitive processes. In this paper I shall briefly outline three paradigms that have been used to study the influence of subliminal stimuli in laboratory settings and I shall present data on the effects of such stimuli on psychophysiological indices. I shall then discuss the use of these paradigms in experiments employing lateralized stimulus presentations. The paper will conclude with the presentation of data obtained by my colleagues and me in a recently completed set of experiments.

Keywords

Left Hemisphere Lexical Decision Task Electrodermal Response Prime Stimulus Left Visual Field 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Wenner-Gren Center 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nathan Brody

There are no affiliations available

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