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Policy Initiatives in Worksite Research: Implications from Research on a Phase Model of Burn-out

  • Robert T. Golembiewski
Part of the Policy Studies Organization Series book series (PSOS)

Abstract

An evolving research program has isolated a dominant pattern of relationships between four classes of variables: 16 features of the worksite, 8 phases of psychological burn-out, 19 symptoms of physical dis-ease, and several measures of performance and productivity. Causal directions have not been determined. Globally, however, as assignments of individuals progress from Phase I through VIII, regular and usually-robust patterns of association exist: the quality of the worksite deteriorates significantly, physiological symptoms increase in nonrandom ways, and performance appraisals as well as objectively-measured productivity trend downward.

Keywords

Phase Model Policy Initiative Performance Appraisal Evolve Research Program Progressive Phase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Policy Studies Organization 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert T. Golembiewski

There are no affiliations available

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