Vaccination against Marek’s Disease

  • L. J. N. Ross
  • P. M. Biggs

Abstract

Marek’s disease is a serious lymphoproliferative disease of the fowl which affects most organs and tissues but has an unusual predilection for peripheral nerves. The disease varies in severity ranging in extremes from the chronic disease, in which peripheral nerve involvement and paralytic signs are the most conspicuous features, to an acute fulminating disease in which multiple and diffuse lympho-mata are present. Prior to the development and wide use of vaccines for the control of the disease, it was of great economic importance to the poultry industry throughout the world. In the acute form mortality of 30% of a flock was common, and in some cases mortality reached over 50%.

Keywords

Migration Urea Lymphoma Attenuation Sedimentation 

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Copyright information

© The Leukaemia Research Fund 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. J. N. Ross
  • P. M. Biggs

There are no affiliations available

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