Abstract

The latter-day Cantabridgians working in vision continue to remind us of the brilliance of Newton, Young and Maxwell in whose shadows they continue to ply their trade. (Mollon and Sharpe, 1983). The contributions of these geniuses are universally admired and understandably so. The list could be extended by adding still another extraordinary Cantabridgian, Lord Rayleigh. Or still another, but this one from the other Cambridge, namely Cambridge, Massachusetts and one whose name as an eponym is virtually a household word to those in this lecture room.

Keywords

Corn Retina Assimilation Nise Namine 

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Copyright information

© The Wenner-Gren Center 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. M. Hurvich
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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