Bargaining and Conflict

  • Ted Stephenson

Abstract

In previous chapters there has been frequent reference to the process of bargaining and its attendant skills. Given the view of the firm as a political arena there is virtually no organisational relationship which does not involve negotiation — decisionmaking is a prime activity involving bargaining and conflict. Individual negotiations are related to particular structural arrangements, which influence such questions as who negotiates with whom, when and about what — in other words negotiations are not random, they are patterned.

Keywords

Mercury Marketing Arena Tral Stake 

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Notes and References

  1. 1.
    E. Etzioni-Halevy, Political Manipulation and Adminstrative Power (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1979) p. 7.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    S. Bacharach and E. J. Lawler, Power and Politks in Organisations (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1980) pp. 156–7;Google Scholar
  3. S. Bacharach and E. J. Lawler, Bargaining (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1981) pp. 42–3, 47, chs 3, 5, 6;Google Scholar
  4. I. C. MacMillan, Strategy Formulation: Political Concepts (St Paul: West, 1978) pp. 29–49.Google Scholar
  5. 3.
    M. and B. Kalib, Kissinger (London: Hutchinson, 1974) For various examples, notably a secret visit to China.Google Scholar
  6. 4.
    H. Kissinger, The White House Years (London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson and Michael Joseph, 1979) pp. 129–30.Google Scholar
  7. See Z. Brzezinski, Power and Principle (London: Weidenfeld & Nicholson, 1983) for numerous examples.Google Scholar
  8. 5.
    MacMillan, ibid., pp. 30–2.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Ted Stephenson 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ted Stephenson

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