The Return of the Native

  • Jagdish Chandra Dave
Part of the Macmillan Hardy Studies book series (MHS)

Abstract

This novel most clearly presents Hardy’s establishment of harmony with the world. His triumph over sorrow through indifference towards it is indicated in a poem which sets the theme of the novel by appearing on the title-page itself:

To sorrow I bade good morrow, And thought to leave her far away behind; But cheerly, cheerly, She loves me dearly; She is so constant to me and so kind. I would deceive her, And so leave her But ah! she is so constant and so kind.1

The same is exhibited in the setting and illustrated in the action of the novel.

Keywords

Depression Europe Steam Amid Smoke 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Hardy, Thomas, The Return of the Native, Macmillan, London, 1964, p. iii.Google Scholar
  2. 6.
    Hardy, Thomas, Jude the Obscure, Macmillan, London, 1957, p. 418.Google Scholar
  3. 7.
    Hardy, Thomas, Far from the Madding Crowd, Macmillan, London, 1952, p. 164.Google Scholar
  4. 9.
    Santayana, G., The Sense of Beauty, Dover Publications, New York, 1955, pp. 47–8.Google Scholar
  5. 57.
    Holloway, John, ‘Hardy’s major fiction’, in Hardy: A Collection of Critical Essays, ed. A.J. Guerard, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J., 1963, pp. 53–4.Google Scholar
  6. 60.
    Hawkins, Desmond, Hardy the Novelist, David & Charles, Newton Abbot, 1965, pp. 21–2.Google Scholar
  7. 63.
    Lawrence, D.H., ‘Study of Thomas Hardy’, in Phoenix: the Posthumous Papers of D.H. Lawrence, ed. Edward D. McDonald, Heinemann, London, 1961, p. 414.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Jagdish Chandra Vallabhram Dave 1985

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  • Jagdish Chandra Dave

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