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Stalin pp 236-263 | Cite as

War

  • Robert H. McNeal
Chapter
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Part of the St Antony’s book series

Abstract

Although Stalin’s last formal meeting with a representative of Hitler’s Reich occurred in February 1940, there was one more, ostensibly impromptu, occasion when he addressed the German ambassador. When the Japanese foreign minister departed from Moscow after signing a treaty with the USSR in April 1941, Stalin emphasized the importance of the agreement by seeing him off at the railway station. Also present was the German ambassador. Stalin sought him out and embraced him, saying, ‘We must remain friends and you must do everything to that end!’ He then repeated the performance with the German military attaché, a lowly personage to receive such recognition, but the only direct link that Stalin had to the German officer corps.1 He had good reason to be concerned with the preservation of peace between Russia and Germany. The Soviet Union now faced victorious German forces along a frontier that stretched from the Arctic to the Black Sea at a time when the modernization of the Red Army was still incomplete.

Keywords

General Staff Polish Government Soviet Leader Soviet People Politburo Member 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Robert H. McNeal 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert H. McNeal
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MassachusettsAmherstUSA

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