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Transition Curves

  • J. Uren
  • W. F. Price
Chapter
Part of the English Language Book Society student editions book series (ELBSSE)

Abstract

A transition curve differs from a circular curve in that its radius is constantly changing. As may be expected, such curves involve more complex formulae than curves of constant radius and their design can be complicated. Circular curves are unquestionably more easy to design than transition curves—they are easily set out on site—and so the questions naturally arise, why are transition curves necessary, and why is it not possible to use circular curves to join all intersecting straights?

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10.17 Further Reading

  1. Department of Transport, Roads and Local Transport Directorate, Departmental Standard TD 9/81, Road Layout and Geometry: Highway Link Design (Department of Transport, 1981).Google Scholar
  2. Department of Transport, Highways and Traffic Directorate, Departmental Advice Note TA 43/84: Highway Link Design (Department of Transport, 1984).Google Scholar
  3. Department of Transport, BIPS 3 Introductory Guide (Department of Transport).Google Scholar
  4. MOSS Systems Ltd, MOSS Surface Modelling by Computer (1984).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© J. Uren and W. F. Price 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Uren
    • 1
  • W. F. Price
    • 1
  1. 1.Departement of Civil EngineeringPortsmouth PolytechnicUK

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