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The Social Context

  • Irene Fox

Abstract

Education does not take place in a vacuum but rather it is located within social space — a society which has a history, structures, institutions, people, classes and values. As such, the meaning that any particular form of education has, both for those who use it and those who do not, needs to be understood within the context of the society within which it is occurring.

Keywords

Private Sector Public School Private School Service Class Public Issue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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The Social Context

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Copyright information

© Irene Fox 1985

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  • Irene Fox

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