British and U.S. practice for determining the capacity of higher speed weaving sections

  • R. J. Salter
Chapter

Abstract

Weaving action takes place in many highway situations in addition to the conventional roundabout intersection where, it could be argued, priority control exists. It is therefore of interest to study the approach to the design of long weaving sections given in the Highway Capacity Manual1. The simplest long weaving section is a one-way highway at one end of which two highways merge and at the other end of which they diverge. Weaving is also inherent in many grade-separated interchanges in addition to the conventional flyover roundabout type of intersection. Where weaving is not found in the intersection then it frequently occurs on the highway between intersections when traffic enters the major route at one junction and leaves it at the next.

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References

  1. 1.
    Highway Capacity Manual. Highway Research Board Special Report 87 National Academy of Sciences, Washington (1965)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Department of Transport. Technical Memorandum H12/76, Weaving Areas for Motorways and All-purpose RoadsGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Department of Transport. Technical Memorandum H18/75, Rural Motorway to Motorway Interchanges, Merging and Diverging lanesGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© R. J. Salter 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. J. Salter
    • 1
  1. 1.University of BradfordUK

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