Advertisement

Classification of tremor

  • Rudy Capildeo
  • Leslie J. J. Findley

Abstract

The classification most widely used throughout the world is that published by the World Health Organisation and revised every 10 years. The Ninth International Statistical Classification of Diseases, Injuries and Causes of Death (ICD 9) was revised in 1974 and volume 1 published in 1977 and volume 2 in 1978. In the United Kingdom all hospital discharge summaries have up to five diagnoses listed and each diagnosis is coded using the WHO classification. This information is collected regionally and forms the basis for the Hospital Inpatient Activities Analysis. It has not yet been extended to outpatient clinics or general practitioner surgeries. The WHO classification is based on a four-digit code. The Ninth Revision has been strongly criticised by Kurtzke (1979) who has demonstrated that ICD 9 is ‘a regression toward a less specific and more symptom-orientated code than its predecessors. It is particularly poor in the category of neurologic disorders with admixtures of disparate entities even at the fourth-digit level. This holds also for neurologic states coded under circulatory, musculo-skeletal and congenital anomalies sections.’

Keywords

Multiple Sclerosis Essential Tremor None None Optic Atrophy Postural Tremor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Capildeo, R., Haberman, S. and Rose, F. C. (1977). New classification of stroke: preliminary communication. Br. Med. J., 2, 1578–80.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Capildeo, R., Haberman, S. and Rose, F. C. (1978). A new classification of stroke. Q. J. Med., 47, 177–96.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Capildeo, R., Haberman, S. and Rose, F. C. (1980). The classification and coding of neurological disease. In Rose, F. C. (ed.), Clinical Neuroepidemiology, Pitman Medical, Tunbridge Wells, pp. 28–36.Google Scholar
  4. Capildeo, R., Haberman, S. and Rose, F. C. (1981). A new classification of parkinsonism. In Rose, F. C. and Capildeo, R. (eds), Research Progress in Parkinson’s Disease, Pitman Medical, Tunbridge Wells, pp. 17–24.Google Scholar
  5. Capildeo, R. and Rose, F. C. (1982). Towards a new classification of migraine. In Rose, F. C. (ed), Advances in Migraine Research and Therapy, Raven Press, New York, pp. 1–7.Google Scholar
  6. Findley, L. J. and Gresty, M. A. (1981). Tremor. Br. J. Hosp. Med., 26, 16–32.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Findley, L. J., Gresty, M. A. and Halmagyi, G. M. (1981) Tremor, the cogwheel phenomenon and clonus in Parkinson’s disease. J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatr., 44, 534–46.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Kurtzke, J. F. (1979). ICD 9: A regression. Am. J. Epidemiol., 109, 383–93.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. WHO (1974). Manual of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases, Injuries and Causes of Death, Ninth Revision, 1974, vol. 1, 1977, and vol. 2, 1978, World Health Organisation, Geneva.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Rudy Capildeo and Leslie J . Findley 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rudy Capildeo
  • Leslie J. J. Findley

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations