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International trade: the new insecurities

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Abstract

Conflicts between an interdependent world economy and a growing mood of national insecurity are causing new strains that are most evident in the field of international trade. Trade, once the symbol of global economic integration, is rapidly becoming the victim of the current recessionary cycle and of rising economic nationalism. The fragility of the world trade environment is more visible as a result of Japanese competitiveness and of structural changes in sectors that were once the mainstay of developed nations-steel, textiles, and automobiles.

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Notes

  1. 5.
    Pierre Judet, Les nouveaux pays industrialises (Paris: Les editions ouvrieres, 1981)Google Scholar
  2. 6.
    See Georges Sokoloff, “L’URSS et l’Ouest: la fin d’un grand cycle d’ouverture?” Economie Prospective Internationale (Paris: Centre d’Etudes Prospectives et d’Informations Internationales, July 1981)Google Scholar
  3. 7.
    See Gerard Wild, “Les dependances de la France dans les relations economiques avec l’Europe de l’Est,” Economie Prospective Internationale (Paris: Centre d’Etudes Prospectives et d’Informations Internationales, August 1981)Google Scholar
  4. 8.
    See R. Paarlberg, “Lessons of the Grain Embargo,” Foreign Affairs (Fall 1980)Google Scholar
  5. 12.
    D. Newberry and J. Stiglitz, The Theory of Commodity Price Stabilization: A Study in the Economics of Risk (forthcoming)Google Scholar

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© Institut Français des Relations Internationales 1982

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