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To what extent are inter- and intraregional differences in psychotropic drug use explained by demographic and socioeconomic factors?

  • David J. King
  • Kathryn Griffiths

Abstract

Geographical comparisons made between psychotropic drug usage levels in different countries (Grimsson et al., 1979) or particular regions (Westerholm, 1979; Elmes et al., 1976a) have not usually taken into consideration the varying proportions of inhabitants that constitute the ‘at risk’ population, or any differences in their living conditions, and without reference to these characteristics of the people receiving drug treatment it is difficult to judge the clinical relevance of any disparities found. Furthermore, since comparable and reliable psychiatric morbidity data are particularly difficult to obtain, regional differences in psychotropic drug prescribing are probably more usefully related to objective demographic and socio-economic measures in the first instance. A Central Mental Health Records Scheme, based on returns from all psychiatric hospitals and units in Northern Ireland, has been in operation since 1960. Although these data are incomplete in some respects, it is hoped to make some comparisons with the drug utilization data in a subsequent study.

Keywords

National Health Service Psychotropic Drug Define Daily Dose Drug Utilization Nordic Council 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The contributors 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • David J. King
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kathryn Griffiths
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Therapeutics and PharmacologyThe Queen’s UniversityBelfastN. Ireland
  2. 2.Consultant PsychiatristHolywell HospitalAntrimN. Ireland
  3. 3.Department of Therapeutics and PharmacologyThe Queen’s UniversityBelfastN. Ireland

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