International Effects of Energy Conservation

  • Anne P. Carter
Part of the Scandinavian Journal of Economics book series (SJE)

Abstract

This paper reports on an energy conservation scenario computed by the United Nations World Model. Energy prices are assumed to rise as they did in the base runs but shifts in fuel mix and energy-saving are assumed to be achieved through increased labor and capital costs. Results suggest that vigorous energy conservation would substantially decrease, but not eliminate, the payments stresses in the reference case. Regional effects vary greatly. Payments-constrained regions could develop somewhat faster despite additional requirements for investment goods. Developed economies would achieve improved trade balances through higher investment and some consumption sacrifice.

Keywords

Zinc Nickel Europe Petroleum Transportation 

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References

  1. Bloodworth, I. J., Bossanyi, E., Bowers, D. W., Crouch, E. A. C., Eden, R. J., Hope, C. W., Humphrey, W. S., Mitchell, J. V., Pullin, D. J. & Stanislaw, J. A.: World Energy Demand to 2020. Executive Summary. Published by the World Energy Conference, London, 1977.Google Scholar
  2. Carter, Anne P. & Petri, Peter A.: Factors Affecting the Long Term Prospects of Developing Regions. Journal of Policy Modeling 1 (3), 359–381, 1979.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Leontief, W. W., Carter, A. P. & Petri, P. A.: The Future of the World Economy. Oxford University Press, New York, 1977.Google Scholar
  4. World Energy Conference, World Energy Resources, 1985–2020. IPC Science and Technology Press, London and New York Technology Press, London and New York, 1978.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Scandinavian Journal of Economics 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne P. Carter
    • 1
  1. 1.Brandeis UniversityWalthamUSA

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