Function and Dysfunction of the GABA System in the Human Brain

  • K. G. Lloyd
  • C. Munari
  • L. Bossi
  • J. Bancaud
  • J. Talairach
  • P. L. Morselli

Abstract

It has been postulated for some time that GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) functions as the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain (cf. Roberts, 1976). Over the past 5–6 years the interest in GABAergic function has increased enormously, with at least 7 symposia or books devoted specifically to this neurotransmitter (Roberts et al, 1976; Fonnum, 1978; Krogsgaard-Larsen et al, 1979; Mandel and De Feudis, 1979; 1980; Fielding and Lal, 1980; Costa et al, 1980) not to mention other speciality symposia where GABA has received major attention (eg. see Chase et al, 1979; Poirier et al, 1979; Yamamura et al, 1980). The amount of information available on central GABA systems is almost reaching overload proportions in all fields (eg. neurophysiology, neurochemistry, neuropharmacology, neuroendocrinology). The result of this is that a picture is beginning to emerge as to which human CNS disorders may involve a GABA neuron dysfunction and therefore may be amenable to treatment by GABAergic drugs. From these various studies and from the sparse clinical information available (Shoulson et al, 1975; Bartholini et al, 1979a; Chase and Tamminga, 1979; Morselli et al, 1980) it appears that abnormal GABAergic function is involved in the genesis of several neurological diseases, but that convincing evidence for GABAergic dysfunction in psychiatric states is still lacking.

Keywords

Dopamine Lipase Dementia Schizophrenia Choline 

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Copyright information

© The Contributors 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. G. Lloyd
    • 1
  • C. Munari
    • 2
  • L. Bossi
    • 1
  • J. Bancaud
    • 2
  • J. Talairach
  • P. L. Morselli
    • 1
  1. 1.Research DepartmentSynthélabo-L.E.R.S.ParisFrance
  2. 2.Unité 97 INSERMHôpital Ste AnneParisFrance

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