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What is to Console Us?: the Politics of Deception in Woolf’s Short Stories

  • Selma Meyerowitz

Abstract

Virginia Woolf’s short stories have frequently been viewed as lyrical fiction that is experimental in form and concerned with a quest for reality.1 This approach, however, denies a political vision which shapes most of the short fiction just as it does Woolf’s feminist essays and her novels. As in A Room of One’s Own and Three Guineas, Woolf’s political analysis of social experience in the short stories is presented through female characters whom she considers a society of outsiders. Because they are denied social and class privilege, women reveal the destructive nature of a classbound society and its effects on individual consciousness and interpersonal relationships.

Keywords

Short Story Female Character Social Criticism Social Convention Destructive Nature 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Jean Guiguet, Virginia Woolf and Her Works, trs. Jean Stewart (London: Hogarth Press, 1965) p. 343.Google Scholar
  2. 4.
    Virginia Woolf, A Writer’s Diary, ed. Leonard Woolf (New York: Harcourt, Brace and World, 1953) p. 30.Google Scholar
  3. 5.
    Virginia Woolf, A Haunted House and Other Short Stories (New York: Harcourt, Brace and World, 1944) p. v. Further references are to this edition, cited as HH.Google Scholar
  4. 6.
    Virginia Woolf,Monday or Tuesday (New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1921) p. 9. Further references are to this edition, cited as MT.Google Scholar
  5. 9.
    Virginia Woolf,A Room of One’ss Own (New York: Harcourt, Brace and World, 1929).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Jane Marcus 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Selma Meyerowitz

There are no affiliations available

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