Energy Supply and Demand

  • Merril Eisenbud
Chapter

Abstract

The food we eat, the homes in which we live, our educational system, our leisure-time activities, and the medical services essential to our health all require access to sources of energy. Energy relieves us of the stressful effects of climate, it enables us to grow food in amounts adequate to fulfill the needs of growing populations, it greatly reduces the constraints of distance on communication and transportation, and it brings to the home of the average person leisure time and relative luxury on a scale unprecedented in history.

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© New York University 1978

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  • Merril Eisenbud

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