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Sources and Elements

  • Geoffrey Till

Abstract

One thing on which virtually all writers on maritime strategy are agreed is that the constituents of sea power are many and varied. One recent listing summarises this very well. Says E. B. Potter:

The elements of sea power are by no means limited to combat craft, weapons, and trained personnel but include the shore establishment, well-sited bases, commercial shipping, and advantageous international alignments. The capacity of a nation to exercise sea power is based also upon the character and number of its population, the character of its government, the soundness of its economy, its industrial efficiency, the development of its internal communications, the quality and number of its harbours, the extent of its coastline, and the location of its homeland, bases, and colonies with respect to sea communications.1

Keywords

Commercial Shipping Merchant Shipping Maritime Community Naval Basis Naval Force 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Potter and Nimitz (1960) p. vii.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Quoted in Richmond (1934) p. 38.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Mahan (1890) p. 23.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Clarke (1967) p. 163.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Quoted in Herrick (1968) p. 82.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Quoted in MccGwire (1973) pp. 280–1.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Quoted in Gorshkov (1972) Art. 10.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    See generally Roskill (1968, 1976); Till (1979) pp. 187–201. Also Kennedy (1976).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Letters of 2 April 1745 and 14 Mar 1745/6 in Julian Gwyn (ed.), The Royal Navy and North America (London: Naval Records Society, 1973) p. 71, 223.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Mahan (1890) p. 58.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Mahan (1911) p. 447.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Captain Mark Kerr quoted in Marder (1940) pp. 401–2.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Mahan vol. 1 (1892) p. 67.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    de Lanessan (1903).Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Corbett vol. 2 (1907) p. 206.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Mahan’s views on all this are conveniently summarised in Westcott (1919) pp. 21–48.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Graham (1965) p. 45.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Quoted in Colomb, P. (1899) p. 142.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    For instance see Dr Walther Ströbe, ‘Forecasting for the Escape of the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau’, Meteorological Magazine, (1976) Nov. p. 322.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Quoted in Marder (1940) p. 473; also Colomb (1896) p. 67.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Gorshkov (1972) Art. 2.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Mackinder (1919).Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Strausz-Hupe (1942) p. 261.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Richmond (1946) p. 28.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Kennan (1966) p. 65.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Castex (1929) vol. v p. 557.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Quoted Strausz-Hupe (1942) p. 146.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Richmond (1954) p. 7.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Earl Macartney, Governor of the Cape, 1797. Quoted in Graham (1965) p. 47.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Gorshkov (1972) Art. 2.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    For a convenient summary see Brodie (1965) pp. 178–88.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Roskill (1952) p. 432.Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Mahan (1890) p. 81.Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Colomb, P. (1899) Appendix pp. xii–xiii.Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    For British experience see Till (1979) esp. Chapter 2.Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    Richmond (1934) p. 117.Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    For an example of the genre see ‘NATO navies outgun Russia’ the London Observer, 30 Mar. 1980.Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Acworth (1935) p. 234 et seq.Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    Dr John Foster, Director of Defense Research and Engineering, 12 March 1970. Quoted in J. Ronald Fox, Arming America (Harvard University Press, 1974) p. 464.Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    Quoted in Marder (1952) p. 296.Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    The Edinburgh Review (1894), quoted in Marder (1940) p. 205.Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    Medina Sidonia quoted in Clarke and Thursfield (1897) p. 166.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Geoffrey Till 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Geoffrey Till

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