The Demand for Freight Movements

  • K. J. Button
  • A. D. Pearman

Abstract

There is little need to re-emphasise that the demand for freight services is derived in nature and that, in consequence, any consideration of demand cannot be treated in isolation from the demand for the final products carried. In this chapter, we concentrate on demand and consider in detail just how the demand for freight transport is generated and how planners and economists attempt to analyse this demand. Because freight transport is closely interrelated with land-use patterns, it is important when considering the demand for freight services to consider at the same time the influences affecting industrial location and distribution decisions. In doing this, we immediately return to one of the oldest and most fundamental problems of applied economics: the identification of the demand relationship and its separation from the supply schedule (see Working, 1927). Not only are there difficulties within the freight sector itself (e.g. does an increase in the amount of goods carried result from an increase in demand or an outward shift in supply?), but the derived nature of demand and the involved interaction between transport and land-use add further complexities impossible to disentangle completely in the real world.

Keywords

Entropy Transportation Income Diesel Stratification 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© K. J. Button and A. D. Pearman 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. J. Button
  • A. D. Pearman

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations