Participation of endorphins in the regulation of pituitary function

  • A. Guidotti
  • L. Grandison

Abstract

Long before the discovery of endogenous opiate peptides, pharmacologists and neuroendocrinologists knew that there were several points of interaction between opiate drugs and endocrine systems. Narcotic analgesics, including morphine, are known to alter ACTH, GH (Gold and Ganong, 1967; George, 1971), prolactin (PRL) (Ojeda et al. 1974; Martin et al. 1975) and LH (Barraclough and Sawyer, 1955) release. Loss of sexual desire, abnormal menses, infertility and spontaneous abortion are frequently observed in addicted patients (George, 1971; Hollister, 1973). Lately, the isolation and identification of endogenous opiate peptides in the brain of all mammalian species studied (Cox et al. 1976; Terenius and Wahlstr00F6m, 1975; Hughes et al. 1975; Pasternak et al. 1975) and the synthesisof an impressive series of derivatives of these peptides with hormone releasing action (Lien etal. 1976; Shaar etal. 1977; Cusan et al. 1977) have contributed several lines of indirect evidence suggesting that these endogenous opiate-like peptides may have physiological roles in the control of neuroendocrine function.

Keywords

Dopamine Morphine Prolactin Haloperidol Infertility 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Akil, H., Mayer, D. J. and Liebeskind, J. C. (1976). Science, 191, 961–2PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Barraclough, C. A. and Sawyer, C. H. (1955). Endocrinology, 57, 329–37PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bloom, F. E., Rossier, J., Battenberg, E. L. F., Bajon, A., French, E., Henriksen, S. J.,Siggins, G. R., Segal, D., Browne, R., Ling, N. and Guillemin, R. (1977). In Advances in Biochemical Psychopharmacology, (eds. E. Costa, and M. Trabucchi), Vol. 18, Raven Press, New York, pp. 89–109Google Scholar
  4. Chen, H. T., Simpkins, J. W., Mueller, G. P. and Meites, J. (1977). Life Sei. 21, 533–42CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Cox, B. M., Goldstein, A. and Li, C. H. (1976). Proc, natn. Acad. Sci, U.S.A., 73, 1821–3CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Cusan, L., Dupont, A., Kledzik, G. S„ Labrie, F., Coy, D. H. and Schally, A. V. (1977). Nature, 268, 544–7PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Elde, R., Hökfelt, T., Johansson, O. and Terenius, L. (1976). Neuroscience, 1, 349–51PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Fratta, W., Yang, H-Y. T., Hong, J. and Costa, E. (1977). Nature, 268, 452–4PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. George, R. (1971). In Narcotic Drugs, Biochemical Pharmacology, (ed. D. Clouet). Plenum Press, New York, pp. 283–99CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Gold, E. M. and Ganong, W. F. (1967). In Neuroendocrinology, (eds. L. Martini and W. F. Ganong), Vol. II, Academic Press, New York, pp. 377–437Google Scholar
  11. Grandison, L. and Guidotti, A. (1977a). Nature, 240, 357–9CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Grandison, L. and Guidotti, A. (1977b). Neuropharmacology, 16, 533–6PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Gunne, L. M., Lindström, L. and Terenius, L. (1977). J. Neural. Transmission, 40, 13–9CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Halasz, B. and Pupp, L. (1965). Endocrinology, 77, 553–62PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Hollister, L. E. (1973). Prog. Brain Res., 39, 373–81CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Hughes, J., Smith, T. W., Kosterlitz, H. W., Fothergill, L. A., Morgan, B. A. and Morris,H. R. (1975). Nature, 258, 577–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Jacobs, J. J., Tremblay, E. C. and Colombel, M. C. (1974). Psychopharmacology, 37, 217–23CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. König, J. F. R. and Klippel, R. A. (1967). The Rat Brain, Krieger Publishing Co., BaselGoogle Scholar
  19. Kreek, M. J. (1973). J. Am. Med. Ass., 223, 665–8CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Lien, E. L., Fewichel, R. L., Garsky, U., Sarantakis, D. and Grant, W, H. (1970). Life Sci., 19, 837–40CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Martin, J. P., Audent, J. and Saunders, A. (1975). Endocrinology, 96, 839–47PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Mueller, G. P., Simpkins, J., Meites, J. and Moore, K. E. (1976). Neuroendocrinology, 20, 121–35PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Ojeda, S. R., Harms, P. G. and McCann, S. M. (1974). Endocrinology, 96, 1695–703Google Scholar
  24. Rivier, C., Vale, W., Ling, N., Brown, M. and Guillemin, R. (1977). Endocrinology, 100, 238–41PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Rossier, J., Vargo, T. M., Minick, S. M., Ling, N., Bloom, F. E. and Guillemin, R. (1977). Proc. natn. Acad. Sci, U.S.A., 74, 5162–5CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Schally, A. V., Redding, T. W., Arimura, A., Dupont, A. and Linthicum, G. L. (1977). Endocrinology, 100, 681–91PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Shaar, C. J., Frederickson, R. C. A., Dininger, N. B. and Jackson, L. (1977). Life Sci., 21, 853–60PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Pasternak, G. W., Goodman, R. and Snyder, S. H. (1975). Life Sci., 16, 1765–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Simantov, R., Kuhar, M. J., Pasternak, G. W. and Snyder, S. H. (1976). Brain Res., 106, 189–97PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Terenius, L. and Wahlström, A. (1975). Life Sci., 16, 1759–64CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Terenius, L., Wahlström, A., Lindström, L. and Widerlöv, E. (1976). Neurosci. Lett., 3, 157–62PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The contributors 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Guidotti
    • 1
  • L. Grandison
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Preclinical PharmacologyNational Institute of Mental HealthSaint Elizabeths HospitalWashingtonUSA

Personalised recommendations