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The Scope and Validity of the Schizophrenic Spectrum Concept

  • Paul H. Wender

Abstract

It is the purpose of this paper to discuss the contributions of the adoption studies of schizophrenia to our understanding of the nature and extent of the schizophrenia spectrum concept. Most people acquainted with the adoption studies of schizophrenia realize that they have helped distinguish the respective roles of nature and nurture in the etiology of these disorders. What many people have not reflected on is that they also have helped us to document the existence of and define the phenomenology of the “schizophrenic spectrum.” In fact, at present they provide the only logical method for characterizing the schizophrenic spectrum and defining its limits.

Keywords

Assortative Mating Biological Parent Index Group Chronic Schizophrenia Adoption Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Brunner/Mazel, Inc. 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul H. Wender

There are no affiliations available

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