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Neuropsychological Concepts and Psychiatric Diagnosis

  • Ralph M. Reitan

Abstract

The theme of this Symposium, oriented toward new evidence as a basis for reconsideration of existing categories of psychiatric diagnosis, clearly points toward the biological bases for behavioral disorders. Such an orientation could have considerable significance in the area of psychiatry with respect to changing emphases and even directions of clinical practice.

Keywords

Psychiatric Diagnosis Brain Lesion Cerebral Hemisphere Cerebral Lesion Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory 
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Copyright information

© Brunner/Mazel, Inc. 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph M. Reitan

There are no affiliations available

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