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Pathogens of Umbelliferous Crops

  • G. R. Dixon

Abstract

The most significant Umbelliferous crops, carrot (Daucus carota) and parsnip (Pastinaca sativa), are grown for their edible roots while with celery (Apium graveolens) the edible petioles are blanched, by earthing up, especially in the UK but to a lesser extent in Europe and the USA. In consequence, some of the most important pathogens are those which disfigure or cause the decay of roots or petioles. Also these crops provide excellent examples of storage rots, for example Mycocentrospora acerina. Violet root rot caused by Helicobasidium purpureum is of interest in relation to control by rotation. It is now evident, particularly in East Anglia (UK), that carrots and sugar beet are important hosts and must be widely separated in the rotation. Foliar blights can cause considerable damage to the growing phases of these crops and also to herb crops. Although the latter are produced on small areas their profitability is such as to warrant more attention from pathologists. The recent study of parsnip canker provides an example of the elucidation of a complex disease syndrome and its partial control by plant breeding. The sections covering virus pathogens are divided on the basis of whether the principal host is carrot, celery or parsnip, but several viruses have wider host ranges and extensive numbers of insect vectors — see especially Celery (Western) Mosaic Virus (section 8.2.5). Some disease syndromes require several viruses to be present in the host, for example Carrot Motley Dwarf, while the phenomenon of ‘helper’ viruses is exemplified by Carrot Mottle Virus.

Keywords

Powdery Mildew Commonwealth Mycological Institute Apium Graveolens Petroselinum Crispum Foliar Blight 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. Sutton, B. C. and Waterson, J. M. (1966). Septoria apiicola. Commonwealth Mycological Institute Descriptions of Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria no. 88, Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
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  3. Kapor, J. N. (1967). Erysiphe heraclei. Commonwealth Mycological Institute Descriptions of Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria no. 154. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  4. Ellis, M. B. and Holliday, P. (1972). Alternaria radicina. Commonwealth Mycological Institute Descriptions of Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria no. 346. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  5. Murant, A. F. (1972). Parsnip Mosaic Virus. Commonwealth Mycological Institute/Association of Applied Biologists Descriptions of Plant Viruses no. 91. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  6. Murant, A. F. (1974a). Carrot Mottle Virus. Commonwealth Mycological Institute/Association of Applled Biologists Descriptions of Plant Viruses no. 137. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  7. Murant, A. F. (1974b). Parsnip Yellow Fleck Virus. Commonwealth Mycological Institute/Association of Applied Biologists Descriptions of Plant Viruses no. 129. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
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  9. Smith, K. M. (1972). A Textbook of Plant Virus Diseases. Longman, London.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© G. R. Dixon 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. R. Dixon
    • 1
  1. 1.Head of Horticulture DivisionSchool of AgricultureAberdeenUK

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