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Pathogens of Composite Crops

  • G. R. Dixon

Abstract

Relatively few pathogens are considered in this chapter and are mainly those which invade lettuce (Lactuca sativa), which is the principal vegetable crop in the family Compositae. Bremia lactucae (downy mildew) has received very considerable attention from agronomists, pathologists, plant breeders and physiologists in the last 30–40 years. Breeding has been directed solely at the utilization of monogenic resistance, with a concomitant upsurge of pathogen virulences capable of overcoming each resistance as it was used for commercial lettuce cultivars. Recent discoveries concerning the sexuality of B. lactucae and clarification of the host resistance-pathogen virulence picture may eventually lead to more stable forms of host resistance being available. In the meanwhile effective chemical control of this Phycomycete pathogen has become a real possibility (see section 4.3.2). Under glasshouse conditions especially, Botrytis cinerea (grey mould) is a major problem for those producing lettuce crops. This pathogen is dealt with in section 6.4.3. Powdery mildew (Erysiphe cichoracearum) is included since it presents an excellent example of the evolution of a pathogen capable of invading the lettuce crop (L. sativa), whereas previously it was confined to wild lettuce (L. serriola). A range of virus pathogens are also described since they present major barriers to the production of a crop where there is a zero tolerance to blemish on the part of the eventual purchaser.

Keywords

Powdery Mildew Downy Mildew Germ Tube Lettuce Plant Yellow Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. Dixon, G. R. (1978). Powdery mildews of vegetable and allied crops. In The Powdery Mildews ( D. M. Spencer, ed.). Academic Press, London.Google Scholar
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  3. Duffus, J. E. (1972). Beet Western Yellows Virus. Commonwealth Mycological Institute/Association of Applied Biologists Descriptions of Plant Viruses no. 26. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
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  6. Tomlinson, J. A. (1970). Lettuce Mosaic Virus. Commonwealth Mycological Institute/Association of Applied Biologists Descriptions of Plant Viruses no. 9. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© G. R. Dixon 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. R. Dixon
    • 1
  1. 1.Head of Horticulture DivisionSchool of AgricultureAberdeenUK

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