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Pathogens of Legume Crops

  • G. R. Dixon

Abstract

Legume crops are of vital importance to world agriculture, providing essential supplies of protein especially for underdeveloped areas. In advanced countries these crops lend themselves to highly mechanised programmed cropping techniques supplying the demands of the processing industry. These techniques have doubled the yield of legume crops over the last 30 years. Both forms of culture result in particular pathogen problems, for example, Erysiphe pisi (powdery mildew) on the ripening crops in Asia and Peronospora viciae (downy mildew) on the lush, unripe processing crops of Europe and the USA. Plant breeders have been particularly active with legume crops, introducing resistance to a wide range of pathogens. This has been highly successful and durable with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi (wilt) but far less so with Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (anthracnose), where many physiological races have evolved in response to the introduction of monogenic resistance.

Keywords

Powdery Mildew Downy Mildew Germ Tube Infected Seed Bean Common Mosaic Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© G. R. Dixon 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. R. Dixon
    • 1
  1. 1.Head of Horticulture DivisionSchool of AgricultureAberdeenUK

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