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Pathogens of Crucifer Crops

  • G. R. Dixon

Abstract

This is the first chapter dealing with pathogens of a particular crop family, in this case the Cruciferae. Within this family the Brassicae are an example of a major and ancient horticultural crop with a wide diversity of morphological form. The edible parts range from swollen hypocotyls as in swede (Brassica napus) and turnip (B. campestris), through the swollen axillary buds of Brussels sprout (B. oleracea var. gemmifera) and swollen apical buds of the various cabbage types (B. oleracea var. capitata) to the inflorescences of cauliflower (B. oleracea var. botrytis). A similar range of pathogens affects all these crops, but the relative importance varies from crop to crop. Thus Plasmodiophora brassicae (clubroot) is of most significance on those with a summer production phase and less so on the winter brassicas while, for example, Alternaria spp. cause greatest damage to seed crops. Pathogens such as Peronospora parasitica (downy mildew) and Thanetophorus cucumeris (damping-off) are of world-wide importance at the seedling growth stage. Mycosphaerella brassicicola (ringspot) is usually restricted to crops produced in warm maritime climates. Cauliflower Mosaic Virus is a good example of a widespread plant virus which has been investigated in depth not only because of its agronomic importance but also for intrinsic biological reasons. More than one virus may be present within crop plants causing a complex disease syndrome and this aspect is discussed at the end of this chapter.

Keywords

Mosaic Virus Powdery Mildew Chinese Cabbage Downy Mildew Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© G. R. Dixon 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. R. Dixon
    • 1
  1. 1.Head of Horticulture DivisionSchool of AgricultureAberdeenUK

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