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Invasion, Colonisation and Symptom Development

  • G. R. Dixon

Abstract

This chapter describes how pathogens infect and colonise a host and the metabolic changes which take place in the diseased plant leading to the visual expression of symptoms. Infection can be said to start as soon as the host and pathogen are in contact and interact with each other. This may occur at any place on the host: roots, stems, leaves or flowers. Most studies of infection have been made using host leaves for the reason that this is the simplest system to study, lending itself easily to in vitro work with detached leaves under controlled conditions; various levels of inoculum can be applied easily and the effects on photosynthetic activity can be measured, thereby giving an indication of the likely yield reduction caused by the pathogen. Colonisation commences when the pathogen has established itself in close association with host cells and has begun to obtain energy for growth from the host. The third stage of host symptom expression may quickly follow colonisation, as in bacterial infections, or take days or weeks, as in infection by Plasmodiophora brassicae (clubroot) of crucifers. It is usually at this stage that the pathogen forms reproductive structures whereby passage to a new and uninfected host may be achieved as the energy resources of the present host are depleted.

Keywords

Powdery Mildew Pentose Phosphate Pathway Downy Mildew Symptom Development Botrytis Cinerea 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© G. R. Dixon 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. R. Dixon
    • 1
  1. 1.Head of Horticulture DivisionSchool of AgricultureAberdeenUK

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