Advertisement

Pathogens of Solanaceous Crops

  • G. R. Dixon

Abstract

In both tropical and temperate areas solanaceous crops are economically important. In the former they are an essential addition to the diet, providing much needed vitamins and minerals as well as flavouring for otherwise monotonous farinaceous foods. Tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) are often second only to bananas (Musa spp.) in value for these countries. In temperate European countries the tomato crop is the mainstay of the glasshouse industry while the USA and Canada large areas are devoted to field production directed principally at the processing industry as preserved fruit and soups. Other and often equally important solanaceous crops include peppers (Capsicum annuum) and aubergines (Solanum melongena). Detailed studies of the pathogens which affect this crop family reflect its economic significance. Bacterial pathogens such as Pseudomonas solanacearum and Corynebacterium michiganense can be controlled only by husbandry techniques, although studies of potential resistance mechanisms are developing. Semi-tropical crops are affected by an endoparasitic powdery mildew (Leveillula taurica), which is not only of intrinsic interest but of increasing commercial significance in areas such as Israel where these crops are grown for an expanding export trade. A complex physiological race pattern is revealed for Fulvia fulva (leaf mould) attendant on the widespread use of monogenic resistance. Resistance to Alternaria solani (early blight) has been related to formation of a phytoalexin, rishitin, and this may eventually point to a means of control.

Keywords

Late Blight Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Tomato Spot Wilt Virus Potato Leaf Roll Virus Tomato Bushy Stunt Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Buddenhagen, I. and Kelman, A. (1964). A. Rev. Phytopath. 2, 203–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Boukema, I. W. (1977). Zaadbelangen 31, 17–18.Google Scholar
  3. Boukema, I. W. and Garretsen, F. (1975). Euphytica 24, 99–104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Butler, L. (1953). Tomato Genet. Co-op. Rep. no. 3, 7–8.Google Scholar
  5. Day, P. R. (1954). PL Path. 3, 35–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Day, P. R. (1956). Tomato Genet. Co-op. Rep. no. 6, 13–14.Google Scholar
  7. Dijkman, A. van and Sijpesteijn, A. K. (1971). Neth. J. Pl. Path. 77, 14–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Kashyap, V. and Levkina, I. (1977). Kestnik. Moskovskogo Universiteta Biologiya no. 1, 65–9.Google Scholar
  9. Lazarovits, G. and Higgins, V. J. (1976a). Can. J. Bot. 54, 224–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Lazarovits, G. and Higgins, V. J. (1976b). Can. J. Bot. 54, 235–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Sijpesteijn, A. K. and Dijkman, A. van (1973). The host-parasite interactions in resistance of tomatoes to Cladosporium fulvum. In Fungal Pathogenicity and the Plant’s Response ( R. J. W. Byrde and C. V. Cutting, eds). Academic Press, London.Google Scholar
  12. Winspear, K. W., Postlethwaite, J. D. and Cotton, R. F. (1970). Ann. appL Biol. 65, 75–83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Wit, P. J. G. M. de (1977). Neth. J. Pl. Path. 83, 109–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Alexandri, A. V. and Lemini, V. (1969). Revta Hort. Vitic. 18, 66–70.Google Scholar
  15. Beleva, L., Sotirova, V. and Popova, D. (1977). Gradinarska i Lozarska Nanka 14, 99–104.Google Scholar
  16. Palti, J. (1971). Phytopath. Med. 10, 139–53.Google Scholar
  17. Reuveni, R. and Rotem, J. (1973). Phytopath. Z. 76, 153–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Reuveni, R., Perl, M. and Rotem, J. (1976). Phytoparasitica 4, 197–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Reuveni, R., Perl, M. and Rotem, J. (1977). Phytopath. Z. 80, 79–84.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Rotem, J. and Cohen, Y. (1966). Pl. Dis. Reptr 50, 635–9.Google Scholar
  21. Tafradjiiski, I., Elenkov, E. and Neshev, G. (1975). C. r. Acad. agric. George Dimitrov, 8, 65–7.Google Scholar
  22. Antonelli, E. (1974). Informatore Fitopatologica 24, 11–20.Google Scholar
  23. Basu, P. K. (1971). Phytopathology 61, 1347–50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Basu, P. K. (1974). Can. Pl. Dis. Survey 54, 45–51.Google Scholar
  25. Berkdale, T. H. and Stonor, A. K. (1973). Pl. Dis. Reptr 57, 964–5.Google Scholar
  26. Berkdale, T. H. and Stonor, A. K. (1977). Pl. Dis. Reptr 61, 63–5.Google Scholar
  27. Beyries, A. and Molot, P. M. (1976). Phytiatrie-Phytopharmacie 25, 201–7.Google Scholar
  28. Bhatia, I. S., Uppal, D. S. and Bahal, K. L. (1972). Indian Phytopath. 25, 231–5.Google Scholar
  29. Coffey, M. D., Whitbread, R. and Marshall, C. (1975). Ann. appl. Biol. 80, 17–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Dorozhkin, M. A. and Ivanyuk, U. R. (1976). Vesti Akademii Navuk BSSR Biyalagichnykh Navuk 4, 60–3.Google Scholar
  31. Dorozhkin, M. A., Remneva, Z. I. and Ivanyuk, I. G. (1975). Biologicheskie Nauki 18, 100–4.Google Scholar
  32. Dorozhkin, N. A., Remneva, Z. I. and Ivanyuk, I. G. (1977). Sel’shokhozyaistvennaya Biologya 12, 58–61.Google Scholar
  33. Dowley, L. J., Routley, D. G. and Pierce, L. C. (1975). Phytopathology 65, 1422–4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. D’yakov, Yu. T., Aschaie, A. and Vainshtein, V. M. (1975). Mikologiya i Fitopatologiya 9, 277–82.Google Scholar
  35. El-Wazeri, S. M. and El-Sayed, S. A. (1977). Egypt J. Hort. 4, 151–6.Google Scholar
  36. Gallegly, M. E. and Marvel, M. E. (1955). Phytopathology 45, 103–9.Google Scholar
  37. Gallegly, M. E. and Niederhauser, J. S. (1959). Genetic control of host—parasite interactions in the Phytophthora late blight disease. In Plant Pathology Problems and Progress 1908–1958 ( C. S. Holton, G. W. Fischer, R. W. Fulton, H. Hart and S. E. A. McCallan, eds). Wisconsin University Press, Madison, Wisc.Google Scholar
  38. Hodosy, S. I. (1969). Duna Tisza Koz. Mezog Kiser Int. Bull. 4, 83–93.Google Scholar
  39. Kravchenko, V. A. (1977). Zakhist Roslin 24, 70–7.Google Scholar
  40. Laterrot, H. (1975). Annls. Amelior. Pl. 25, 129–49.Google Scholar
  41. Matthewson, D. K. (1977). New Phytol. 78, 643–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Melita, P., Vyas, K. M. and Saksena, S. B. (1974). Hindustan Antibiotics Bull. 16, 210–4.Google Scholar
  43. Peng, J. H. and Black, L. L. (1976). Phytopathology 66, 958–63.Google Scholar
  44. Pristou, R. and Gallegly, M. E. (1954). Phytopathology 44, 81–6.Google Scholar
  45. Tsupkova, N. A. (1977). Zashchita Rastenii 7, 62–3.Google Scholar
  46. Turkensteen, L. J. (1973). Partial Resistance of Tomatoes against Phytophthora infestans, the Late Blight Fungus. Mededelingen van der Instituut voor Plantenziektenkundig Onderzoek no. 633, p. 88.Google Scholar
  47. Walker, J. C. (1952). Diseases of Vegetable Crops. McGraw-Hill, New York.Google Scholar
  48. Walter, J. M. (1967). A. Rev. Phytopath. 5, 131–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Ward, E. W. B., Unwin, C. H. and Stoessl, A. (1975). Phytopathology 65, 168–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Martinson, V. A. and Hogenboom, N. G. (1968). Euphytica 17, 173–82.Google Scholar
  51. Akinrefon, O. A. (1969). Ann. appl. Biol. 63, 303–13.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Barksdale, T. H. and Stoner, A. K. (1975). Pl. Dis. Reptr 59, 648–52.Google Scholar
  53. Campbell, W. P. and Griffiths, D. A. (1974). Trans. Br. mycol. Soc. 63, 19–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Davet, P. (1971). Phytopath. Medit. 10, 159–63.Google Scholar
  55. Davet, P. (1972). Phytopath. Medit. 11, 103–108.Google Scholar
  56. Davet, P. (1975). C. r. hebd. Séanc. Acad. Sci. Paris, D 281, 143–6. Davet, P. (1976a). Ann. Phytopath. 8, 159–69.Google Scholar
  57. Davet, P. (1976 b). Ann. Phytopath. 8, 79–82.Google Scholar
  58. Davet, P. (1976e). Ann. Phytopath. 8, 191–202.Google Scholar
  59. Davet, P. and Ravise, A. (1976). C. r. hebd. Séanc. Acad. Sci. Paris, D 282, 1351–4.Google Scholar
  60. Delon, R. (1974). Phytopath. Z. 80, 199–208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Delon, R., Reisinger, O. and Mangenot, F. (1973). Ann. Phytopath. 5, 151–62.Google Scholar
  62. Ebben, M. H. (1974). A. Rep. Glasshouse Crops Res. Inst. 1973, 127–35.Google Scholar
  63. Elenkov, E. (1976). Rastitelna Zashchita 24, 40–3.Google Scholar
  64. Elenkov, E. and Bakharieva, V. (1975). Rastitelna Zashchita 23, 31–5.Google Scholar
  65. Farley, J. D. (1976). Phytopathology 66, 640–1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Goodenough, P. W. and Kempton, R. J. (1976). Physiol. Pl. Path. 9, 313–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Goodenough, P. W. and Maw, G. A. (1973). Ann. appl. Biol. 73, 339–47.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Goodenough, P. W. and Maw, G. A. (1974). Physiol. PI. Path. 4, 51–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  69. Goodenough, P. W. and Maw, G. A. (1975). Physiol. Pl. Path. 6, 145–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Griffiths, D. A. and Campbell, W. P. (1972). Trans. Br. mycol. Soc. 59, 483–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Griffiths, D. A. and Campbell, W. P. (1973). Trans. Br. mycol. Soc. 61, 529–36.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Hawes, C. R. and Beckett, A. (1977). Trans. Br. mycol. Soc. 68, 304–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. Hogenboom, N. G. (1970). Euphytica 19, 413–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Huang, H. C. and Patrick, Z. A. (1972). Can. J. Bot. 50, 2423–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Jones, D. R., Graham, W. G. and Ward, E. W. B. (1975). Phytopathology 65, 1409–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  76. Laterrot, H. (1972). AnnlsAmelior. Pl. 22, 109–113.Google Scholar
  77. McIntyre, J. L. and Hawkins, L. (1977). Mycologia 69, 756–60.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. Miyakado, M., Kato, T., Ohno, N. and Koshimizuk, K. (1975). Phytochemistry 14, 2717.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Robbins, M. and Angel, F. F. (1970). J. Am. Soc. hort. Sci. 95, 469–71.Google Scholar
  80. Sharma, S. L. and Soli, H. S. (1976). Indian Phytopath. 28, 130.Google Scholar
  81. Sharma, S. L., Chowfla, S. C. and Soli, H. S. (1976). Kavaka 4, 61–63.Google Scholar
  82. Sharma, S. L., Chowfla, S. C. and Soli, H. S. (1977). Indian J. MycoL PL Path. 6, 51–4.Google Scholar
  83. Trique, B. (1975). Phytopath. Z. 83, 1–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. Violin, R. B. and McMillan, R. T. (1978). Euphytica 27, 75–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. Waterhouse, G. M. (1963). Key to the Species of Phytophthora de Bary. Mycological Paper no. 92. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  86. Weststeijn, G. (1973). Neth. J. Pl. Path. 79, Suppl. 1, 86.Google Scholar
  87. White, J. G. and Scott, A. C. (1973). Ann. appl. Biol. 73, 163–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  88. Yordanov, M., Mamelyan, H. and Stoyana, Z. (1974). C r. Acad. agric. Georgie Dimitrov 7, 49–50.Google Scholar
  89. Beckman, C. H. (1969a). Phytopathology 59, 837–43.Google Scholar
  90. Beckman, C. H. (1969b).Phytopathology 59, 1477–83.Google Scholar
  91. Besri, M. (1977). The seed stage of Fusarium oxysporum f. lycopersici. In Travaux dédiés à George Viennot-Bourgin. Sociétié Française de Phytopathologie, Paris, pp. 19–25.Google Scholar
  92. Bewley, W. F. (1922). Ann. appl. Biol. 9, 116–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  93. Carrasco, A., Boudet, A. M. and Marigo, G. (1978). PhysioL Pl. Path. 12, 225–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  94. Cooper, R. M. and Wood, R. K. S. (1974). Physiol. Pl. Path. 4, 443–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  95. Cronshaw, D. K. and Pegg, G. F. (1976). Physiol. Pl. Path. 9, 33–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  96. Dimond, A. E. (1966). Pl. PhysioL, Lancaster 41, 119–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  97. Dixon, G. R. and Pegg, G. F. (1969). Trans. Br. mycol. Soc. 53, 109–18. Dixon, G. R. and Pegg, G. F. (1972). Ann. appl. Biol. 36, 147–54.Google Scholar
  98. Gabe, H. L. (1975). Trans. Br. mycol. Soc. 64, 156–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  99. Gentille, I. A. and Matta, A. (1975). Physiol. Pl. Path. 5, 27–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  100. Harries, H. C. (1965). A. Rep. Glasshouse Crops Res. Inst. 1964, 115–24.Google Scholar
  101. Homma, Y. and Ohata, K. (1977). Bulletin no. 30. Agricultural Experiment Station, Shikoku, pp. 103–114.Google Scholar
  102. Homma, Y., Ishii, M. and Ohata, K. (1978). Bulletin no. 31. Agricultural Experiment Station, Shikoku, pp. 71–85.Google Scholar
  103. Hubbeling, N., Alexander, L. J. and Cirulli, M. (1971). Meded. Fakulteit Landbouwwetenschappen Gent 36, 1006–16.Google Scholar
  104. Isaac, I. (1967). A. Rev. Phytopath. 5, 201–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  105. Kedar, N., Retig, N. and Katan, J. (1967). Euphytica 16, 258–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  106. Laterrot, H. (1976). Annls Amelior. PL 26, 485–91.Google Scholar
  107. Locke, T. and Thorpe, I. G. (1976). Pl. Path. 25, 59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  108. Ludwig, R. A. (1952). Studies on the Physiology of Hadromycotic Wilting in the Tomato Plant. Technical Bulletin no. 20. Macdonald College, Canada.Google Scholar
  109. Marte, M., Zazzerini, A. and Tamburi, F. (1975). Phytopath. Z. 84, 47–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  110. McCance, D. J. and Drysdale, R. B. (1975). Physiol. Pl. Path. 7, 221–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  111. Montalbini, P. and Raggi, V. (1974). Phytopath. Medit. 13, 124–7.Google Scholar
  112. Patrick, T. W., Hall, R. and Fletcher, R. A. (1977). Can. J. Bot. 55, 377–82.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  113. Pegg, G. F. (1976). Physiol. Pl. Path. 9, 215–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  114. Pegg, G. F. and Selman, I. W. (1959). Ann. appl. Biol. 47, 222–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  115. Pegg, G. F. and Sequeira, L. (1968). Phytopathology 58, 476–83.Google Scholar
  116. Pegg, G. F. and Vessey, J. C. (1973). PhysioL Pl. Path. 3, 207–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  117. Pegg, G. F., Gull, K. and Newsam, R. J. (1976). Physiol PL Path. 8, 221–4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  118. Pollock, C. J. and Drysdale, R. B. (1976 a). Phytopath. Z. 86, 353–6.Google Scholar
  119. Pollock, C. J. and Drysdale, R. B. (1976 b). Phytopath. Z. 86, 56–66.Google Scholar
  120. Raggi, V., Zazzerini, A., Barberini, B., Ferranti, F. and Draoli, R. (1974). Phytopath. Z. 79, 258–80.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  121. Stoddart, J. L. and Carr, A. H. J. (1966). Ann. appl. Biol. 58, 81–92.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  122. Talboys, P. W. (1957). Trans. Br. mycoL Soc. 40, 415–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  123. Talboys, P. W. (1972). Proc. R. Soc. B 181, 319–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  124. Tjamos, E. C. and Smith, I. M. (1975). Physiol. Pl. Path. 6, 215–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  125. Visser, S. (1977). Phytophylactica 9, 65–70.Google Scholar
  126. Walker, J. C. (1971). Fusarium Wilt of Tomato. Monograph no. 6. American Phytopathological Society, St. Paul, Minn.Google Scholar
  127. Walter, J. M. (1967). A. Rev. Phytopath. 5, 131–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  128. Wood, R. K. S. (1967). Physiological Plant Pathology. Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford.Google Scholar

Further Reading

  1. Hayward, A. C. and Waterston, J. M. (1964). Pseudomonas solanacearum. Commonwealth Mycological Institute Descriptions of Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria no. 15. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  2. Hayward, A. C. and Waterston, J. M. (1964). Corynebacterium michiganense. Commonwealth Mycological Institute Descriptions of Pathogenic and Fungi and Bacteria no. 19. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  3. Stapp, C. (1961). Bacterial Plant Pathogens. Oxford University Press, London. Walter, J. M. (1967). A. Rev. Phytopathol. 5, 131–62.Google Scholar
  4. Holliday, P. and Mulder, J. L. (1976). Fulvia fulva. Commonwealth Mycological Institute Descriptions of Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria no. 487. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  5. Dixon, G. R. (1978). Powdery mildews of vegetables and allied crops. In The Powdery Mildews ( D. M. Spencer, ed.). Academic Press, London.Google Scholar
  6. Mukerji, K. G. (1968). Leveillula taurica. Commonwealth Mycological Institute Descriptions of Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria no. 182. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  7. Ellis, M. B. and Gibson, I. A. S. (1975). Alternaria solani. Commonwealth Mycological Institute Descriptions of Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria no. 475. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  8. Holliday, P. and Punithalingam, E. (1970). Didymella lycopersici. Common-wealth Mycological Institute Descriptions of Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria no. 272. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  9. Aberdeen, J. E. C. (1976). Queensland J. Agric. 102, 355–81.Google Scholar
  10. Mordue, J. E. M. (1967). Colletotrichum coccodes. Commonwealth Mycological Institute Descriptions of Pathogenic Fungi and Bacterial no. 131. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  11. Punithalingam, E. and Holliday, P. (1969). Pyrenochaeta lycopersici. Commonwealth Institute Descriptions of Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria no. 398. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  12. Subramanian, C. V. (1968). Thielaviopsis basicola. Commonwealth Mycological Institute Descriptions of Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria no. 170. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  13. Waterhouse, G. M. and Waterston, J. M. (1964). Phytophthora nicotianae var. nicotianae. Commonwealth Mycological Institute of Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria no. 34. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  14. Waterhouse, G. M. and Waterston, J. M. (1964). Phytophthora nicotianae var. parasitica. Commonwealth Mycological Institute Descriptions of Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria no. 35. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  15. Hawkesworth, D. L. and Talboys, P. W. (1970). Verticillium albo-atrum. Commonwealth Mycological Institute Descriptions of Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria no. 255. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  16. Hawkesworth, D. L. and Talboys, P. W. (1970). Verticillium dahliae. Commonwealth Mycological Institute Descriptions of Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria no. 256. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  17. Subramanian, C. V. (1970). Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Commonwealth Institute Descriptions of Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria no. 255. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  18. Bercks, R. (1970). Potato Virus X. Commonwealth Mycological Institute/ Association of Applied Biologists Descriptions of Plant Viruses no. 4. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  19. Black, L. M. (1970). Potato Yellow Dwarf Virus. Commonwealth Mycological Institute/Association of Applied Biologists Descriptions of Plant Viruses no. 35. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  20. Broadbent, L. (1976). A. Rev. Phyto path. 14, 75–96.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Delgado-Sanchez, S. and Grogan, R. G. (1970). Potato Virus Y. Commonwealth Mycological Institute/Association of Applied Biologists Descriptions of Plant Viruses no. 37. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  22. Fulton, R. W. (1971). Tobacco Streak Virus. Commonwealth Mycological Institute/Association of Applied Biologists Descriptions of Plant Viruses no. 44. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  23. Hollings, M. and Stone, O. M. (1971). Tomato Aspermy Virus. Commonwealth Mycological Institute/Association of Applied Biologists Descriptions of Plant Viruses no. 79. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  24. Hollings, M. and Huttinga, H. (1976). Tomato Mosaic Virus. Commonwealth Mycological Institute/Association of Applied Biologists Descriptions of Plant Viruses no. 156. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  25. Le, T. S. (1970). Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus. Commonwealth Mycological Institute/Association of Applied Biologists Descriptions of Plant Viruses no. 39. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  26. Martelli, G. P., Quacquarelli, A. and Russo, M. (1971). Tomato Bushy Stunt Virus. Commonwealth Mycological Institute/Association of Applied Biologists Descriptions of Plant Viruses no. 69. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  27. Murant, A. F. (1970). Tomato Black Ring Virus. Commonwealth Mycological Institute/Association of Applied Biologists Descriptions of Plant Viruses no. 38. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  28. Peters, D. (1970). Potato Leaf Roll Virus. Commonwealth Mycological Institute/ Association of Applied Biologists Descriptions of Plant Viruses no. 36. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  29. Smith, K. M. (1972). A Textbook of Plant Virus Diseases. Longman, London.Google Scholar
  30. Stace-Smith, R. (1970). Tomato Ring Spot Virus. Commonwealth Mycological Institute/Association of Applied Biologists Descriptions of Plant Viruses no. 18. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar
  31. Zaitlin, M. (1975). Tobacco Mosaic Virus (Type Strain). Commonwealth Mycological Institute/Association of Applied Biologists Descriptions of Plant Viruses no. 151. Commonwealth Mycological Institute, Kew.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© G. R. Dixon 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. R. Dixon
    • 1
  1. 1.Head of Horticulture DivisionSchool of AgricultureAberdeenUK

Personalised recommendations