Pathogens of Monocotyledon Crops

  • G. R. Dixon

Abstract

This chapter brings together several diverse Angiosperm families, Graminaeae (Zea sp. — sweet-corn), Amaryllidaceae (Allium spp. — onion and leek) and Liliaceae (Asparagus sp.). Pathogens affecting these crops are similarly diverse, ranging across the whole spectrum of micro-organisms. As with some other horticultural crops, research into agricultural crop pathogens has particular relevance to some monocotyledon horticultural crops. This is especially the case with pathogens which affect maize or corn crops such as the bacterium Erwinia stewartii (wilt), the fungus Ustilago maydis (smut) and the complex of Fusarium spp. which cause stalk rot, and many of the viruses. Work on these pathogens in agricultural crops is essential for an understanding of their biology and control which can be applied to horticultural crops. Other notable and recent developments have included the unravelling of the life cycle of Botrytis allii (onion neck rot), which is now known to be seed-borne. Control may be achieved even at the dry bulb storage stage by use of systemic fungicides applied as seed dressings. The causal agent of white tip of leek (Phytophthora porn) is found to incite a necrotic flecking of white storage cabbage, thereby providing a rationale for some of the losses which take place with this product in the field and in store. The importance of ornamentals as alternative hosts to pathogens of vegetable crops is emphasised by the bacterium Pseudomonas alliicola and viruses such as Onion Yellow Dwarf Virus. Considerable work is still required to understand some virus pathogens, particularly those which affect the asparagus crop. Although this crop is only produced on small land units, the financial returns per unit of land area are very high and crop productivity could be raised significantly for utilisation in soup production by processing factories.

Keywords

Nicotinate Germinate Xylose Pseudomonas Fructose 

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Copyright information

© G. R. Dixon 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. R. Dixon
    • 1
  1. 1.Head of Horticulture DivisionSchool of AgricultureAberdeenUK

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