Towards a Positive Epistemology

  • Raymond Boudon

Abstract

At present, philosophers of science are taking very little interest in the human sciences. Of course this indifference is understandable. The achievements and applications of the natural sciences are incomparably more spectacular than the conquests of the human sciences. The former give the impression of a continuous development, although historians of science show us that the growth or decline of certain branches of even the most rigorous of these disciplines — mathematics — is bound up with events of an anecdotal nature and is determined by the structure of the occupational context. Despite this, it is difficult not to gain the impression that the history of the natural sciences is guided as if by internal necessity.

Keywords

Europe Explosive Aphasia 

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Notes

  1. 8.
    Don Martindale, “Limits to the uses of mathematics in the study of sociology”, in Mathematics and the Social Sciences, Philadelphia, American Academy of Political and Social Science, June 1963.Google Scholar
  2. 12.
    Kingsley Davis, “The Myth of Functionalism as a Special Method in Sociology and Anthropology”, American Sociological Review, 24 (1959) pp. 757–773;CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Carl Hempel, “The Logic of Functional Analysis” in Aspects of Scientific Explanation (Glencoe: The Free Press, 1965) pp. 297–330;Google Scholar
  4. Ernest Nagel, Logic without Metaphysics (Glencoe: The Free Press, 1960).Google Scholar
  5. 14.
    Leslie White, “Definitions and Conceptions of Culture” in G. Direnzo, Concepts, Theory and Explanation in the Behavioural Sciences (New York: Random House, 1966).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond Boudon

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