Database Management

  • Andrew M. McCosh
  • Mawdudur Rahman
  • Michael J. Earl

Abstract

‘Database’ is now common terminology. However, it means different things to different people. The lay-user is prone to ascribe the term to all data in the organisation, whilst the information systems specialist sees database in a technical light. This chapter develops such a technical view. Yet the lay view has conceptual value, conceiving the database as the structural foundation of management information systems, emphasising data as the bedrock and raw material of information, recognising the importance of data availability and reliability.

Keywords

Migration Expense Line Production Sorting Fishing 

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Notes

  1. Blumenthal, S. C., Management Information System: A Framework for Planning and Development. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1969.Google Scholar
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  3. Flores, I., Data Structure and Management. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1970.Google Scholar
  4. Martin, J., Computer Data-Base Organisation. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1975.Google Scholar
  5. Nolan, R. L., ‘Computer Databases: The Future is Now’, Harvard Business Review, September–October 1973.Google Scholar
  6. ‘The Cautious Path to a Data-Base’, EDP Analyzer, 11, No. 6, 1973.Google Scholar
  7. ‘Organising the Corporate Data-Base’, EDP Analyzer, 8, No. 3, 1970.Google Scholar
  8. ‘Processing the Corporate Data-Base’, EDP Analyzer, 8, No. 4, 1970.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Andrew M. McCosh, Mawdudur Rahman and Michael J. Earl 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew M. McCosh
  • Mawdudur Rahman
  • Michael J. Earl

There are no affiliations available

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