Abstract

Besides implying (1) structure and (2) behaviour, the term ‘organisation’ also implies (3) processes. These may be defined as a ‘series of actions that lead to the accomplishment of objectives’.1 As such, processes may be functional (selling, producing, etc.) or administrative. It is only with the latter that this section is concerned. Major administrative processes include organising, communicating, controlling, leading, delegation, planning and decision-making — a list that could be greatly extended by inclusion of additional activities of a supporting or facilitating nature, or further complicated by treating some processes as phases or subparts of others.

Keywords

Income Assure Pyramid Clarification Mete 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    W. H. Newman and C. E. Summer, The Process of Management ( Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1961 ) p. 9.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    L. Urwick, The Elements of Administration ( New York: Harper, 1944 ) p. 125.Google Scholar
  3. 4.
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  4. 6.
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    E. P. Learned and A. T. Sproat, Organization Theory and Policy:.iVotes for Analysis (Homewood, Ill.: Richard D. Irwin, Inc., 1966 ), p. 49.Google Scholar
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    For details see Fritz J. Roethlisberger, Training for Human Relations ( Boston: Harvard University Press, 1954 ) p. 14.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Ukandi G. Damachi 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ukandi G. Damachi
    • 1
  1. 1.International Institute for Labour StudiesGenevaSwitzerland

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