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Statistical treatment of floods

  • N. T. Kottegoda

Abstract

A flood is an unusually high stage in a river that can cause damage to adjacent areas. Floods vary spatially and temporally in magnitude and are often measured through their peak discharges. The structural and hydraulic designs of dams and bridges are based on such extreme flows in water courses. Furthermore, the frequency of occurrence, the maximum stage reached, the volume of flood water, the area inundated and the duration of floods are of importance to the civil engineer when planning and designing roads, buildings and structures. In addition, there are dependent economic problems such as flood-plain zoning and flood insurance.

Keywords

Return Period Flood Event Annual Maximum General Extreme Value General Extreme Value Distribution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© N. T. Kottegoda 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. T. Kottegoda
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Civil EngineeringUniversity of BirminghamUK

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