Oxidised Starch Plus Activated Charcoal in the Nephrectomised Rat and Uraemic Man

  • E. A. Friedman
  • M. J. Saltzman
  • M. M. Beyer
Chapter
Part of the Strathclyde Bioengineering Seminars book series (KESE)

Summary

Impetus for study of intestinal sorbents in the management of renal failure stems from the initial trials of Yatzidis and Giordano, who administered oral doses of activated charcoal (Yatzidis, 1964) and oxidised starch (oxystarch) (Giordano et al. 1971, 1972), respectively, to uraemic patients as adjunctive therapy. Evidence of in vitro binding of nitrogen-containing compounds has been provided for oxystarch by Meriwether and Kramer (1976) and for charcoal by Yatzidis (1964), offering encouragement in the quest for extraction of clinically important quantities of nitrogenous wastes by ingested sorbents. Summarised herein are the results of administering a combination of oxidised starch and charcoal to two rat models of renal failure as well as a limited trial in uraemic patients.

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References

  1. Friedman, E. A., Fastook, J., Beyer, M. M., Rattazzi, T., and Josephson, A. S. (1974). Potassium and nitrogen binding in the human gut by ingested oxidized starch. Trans. Amer. Soc. Artif. Int. Organs, 20, 161–167.Google Scholar
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  7. Yatzidis, H. (1964). A convenient haemoperfusion micro-apparatus over charcoal for the treatment of endogenous and exogenous intoxications. I. Its use as an effective artificial kidney. Proc. Eur. Dial. Transpl. Assoc. 1, 83–87.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Bioengineering Unit, University of Strathclyde 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. A. Friedman
  • M. J. Saltzman
  • M. M. Beyer

There are no affiliations available

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