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The Electrification of the Home: the Golden Age?

  • Leslie Hannah

Abstract

At the end of the First World War the use of electricity in the home was almost exclusively for lighting purposes and was confined to the rich: only half a million houses, perhaps 6 per cent of the total, were wired for electricity. Despite four decades of development, there was still enormous unfulfilled potential for expansion of use to new purposes in the more prosperous homes, and for the spread of electric lighting to the homes of the middle classes and the better-off among the working classes. Already by the end of the war there was a considerable backlog of potential demand, for wartime restrictions had held up new connections, and some undertakings had also tried to stifle new demand by insisting on high minimum guaranteed payments for supply in order to avoid further pressure on their already overloaded mains. With the end of restrictions and falling electricity prices, however, the extensions of systems and the connection of new consumers would resume; and even more new houses, and older houses converting from gas, would demand a supply.

Keywords

Vacuum Cleaner Coal Fire Overhead Line Domestic Consumer Domestic Sale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes on the Text

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Copyright information

© The Electricity Council 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leslie Hannah
    • 1
  1. 1.Emmanuel CollegeCambridgeUK

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