The Soviet Army is the second largest army in the world. The six non-Soviet members of the Warsaw Pact take their organisations, tactics, and the great majority of their equipments from Russia. Some twenty-seven other countries throughout the world equip their armies with varying amounts of Soviet equipments, and some thirteen armies are trained by Soviet training teams and missions.


Target Acquisition Warsaw Pact Electronic Warfare Fire Plan Deliberate Attack 


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Reference material

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© John Hemsley 1979

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  • John Hemsley

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