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Poetic patriots and rebels

  • Patrick Waddington

Abstract

While pursuing his interest in the best descriptive literature of the day, from the philippics of Carlyle to the prose georgics of George Eliot, Turgenev was also exploring trends in English poetry. It is natural that he should have looked first to what may loosely be termed Pre-Raphaelite circles, especially in view of his contacts with Allingham and Burne-Jones. In particular, he conceived a quite obsessive desire to come to know Rossetti. Someone, possibly Ralston, had drawn his attention to this ‘new’ writer and artist and given him a copy of the controversial Poems, published in 1870. Without knowing it, he had read a work of Rossetti’s in the Athenaeum as early as 1852, and condemned it (quite unjustly) for its artificiality. This was the then anonymous piece called ‘The Card-Dealer; or, Vingt-et-Un’, which Turgenev had taken to be by Henry Chorley. One imagines a similar reaction of amusement and perplexity when faced with the full collection, for the obstacle was primarily linguistic. Turgenev could not understand it: was his own English really so bad that he could not follow this minor modern author?

Keywords

French Translation English Writer Full Collection English Poetry Earthly Paradise 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Patrick Waddington 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick Waddington
    • 1
  1. 1.Victoria University of WellingtonNew Zealand

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