The Effect of Emission Controls on Fuel Economy

  • D. R. Blackmore

Abstract

The last seven years have seen a progressive lowering of permitted vehicle emission levels, particularly in the US (table 8.1) where signs of a levelling-off are perhaps beginning to be evident. While this was going on, scientists within the industry were noting what sacrifices in performance were needed to achieve these levels, and one of these was fuel economy. When the fuel crisis of 1973 developed, the question of the deleterious effect of emission control on fuel economy was raised more sharply than before, and a public debate ensued in the US in particular.

Keywords

Combustion Vortex Manifold Europe Hydrocarbon 

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Copyright information

© D. R. Blackmore and A. Thomas 1977

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  • D. R. Blackmore

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