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Principles Governing Fuel Economy in a Gasoline Engine

  • D. R. Blackmore

Abstract

The power unit in the majority of passenger cars on the road today is still the gasoline engine. As the name implies, its primary function is to produce the appropriate power as and when the driver commands. However, the demands of the current political and economic climate have brought back into focus yet again the increasing need for this power unit to be an efficient one.

Keywords

Fuel Consumption Compression Ratio Fuel Economy Gasoline Engine Automatic Transmission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© D. R. Blackmore and A. Thomas 1977

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  • D. R. Blackmore

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