The Effect of Crankcase Lubricants on Fuel Economy

  • B. Bull
  • A. J. Humphrys

Abstract

The internal combustion engine, whilst more efficient than its predecessor the steam engine, is still only capable at present of converting about a quarter of the energy available from its fuel into useful work. The remaining three-quarters are lost as heat in the exhaust gases, in the cooling water and in removal from the external surfaces of the engine (see also appendix E).

Keywords

Combustion Steam Transportation Marketing Diesel 

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Copyright information

© D. R. Blackmore and A. Thomas 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Bull
  • A. J. Humphrys

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