Advertisement

Transport, Power and Industry

  • Francis A. Lees
  • Hugh C. Brooks

Abstract

Proponents of economic development often search for a single strategic souce of economic growth. Important candidates include saving, capital formation, entrepreneurial activity and infrastructure. Transportation must rank high in such evaluations. Efficient, low-cost transportation broadens the market area, facilitates export of agricultural products, and lowers the real cost of necessary imports. Even in developed nations investment in transportation facilities constitutes an important activity representing 10–12 per cent of gross domestic investment.

Keywords

Political Development Sugar Factory Town Area Passenger Traffic Freight Traffic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 7.
    C. Wilkins, Transport Sector Planning in the Sudan ( Khartoum: National Council for Research-Economic and Social Research Council, September 1974 ) pp. 4–6.Google Scholar
  2. 9.
    ADAR Corporation, The Sudan Transport Study: A Presentation (Democratic Republic of the Sudan in association with Kuwait Fund for Arab Economic Development, 1974).Google Scholar
  3. 10.
    Hamid Abdel Haleem, ‘Power for Industry in the Sudan’, in Papers Presented to the First Erkowit Conference, 1966, p. 99.Google Scholar
  4. 12.
    Faisal B Imam (editor), Papers Presented to the First Erkowit Conference, (University of Khartoum, 1966) p. 3.Google Scholar
  5. 13.
    Ministry of Planning, Economic Survey 1970 ( Democratic Republic of the Sudan, January 1972 ) p. 27.Google Scholar
  6. 18.
    Sayed Abdalla Fadlalla, ‘Government Policy Toward Industrialisation’, Papers Presented at the First Erkowit Conference, 1966, p. 13.Google Scholar
  7. 19.
    Osman Hassan Saeed, The Industrial Bank of Sudan, 1962–1968: An Experiment in Development Banking (Khartoum University Press, 1971) p. 54.Google Scholar
  8. 20.
    El-Sayed El-Bushra, ‘The Location of Industry in the Sudan’, Papers Presented at the First Erkowit Conference, 1966, p. 171.Google Scholar
  9. 25.
    Hikmat Sh. Nashashibi, ‘New Lending Techniques by Arab Development Funds’, Euromoney, Special Supplement on Arab Capital Markets, March 1976, pp. 63–4. According to Mr Nashashibi, Manager of the Kuwait International Investment Company, the Sudan is one of twelve Arab countries that will require financing of a $23 billion combined payments deficit over the period 1976–85. In this connection the main problem is viewed as lack of institutions to appraise project opportunities, rather than lack of funds.Google Scholar
  10. 27.
    Bank of Sudan, Fourteenth Annual Report, 1973, pp. 90–1.Google Scholar
  11. 28.
    S. Koncar Kjurdjevic, ‘Prospects of Gypsum Industries in the Sudan’, Papers Presented at the First Erkowit Conference, 1966, p. 322.Google Scholar
  12. 29.
    A. A. R. Elagib, ‘Prospects of Utilising Sudan Iron Ores’, Papers Presented at the First Erkowit Conference, 1966, p. 279.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Francis A. Lees and Hugh C. Brooks 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francis A. Lees
  • Hugh C. Brooks

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations