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Causes and Origins of the Current Worldwide Inflation

  • Hans Genberg
  • Alexander K. Swoboda
Part of the International Economic Association Series book series (IEA)

Abstract

Inflation as a worldwide phenomenon is a popular topic for discussion and lament, even in the daily press, weeklies, and bar-rooms. Yet its origins and causes, the topic assigned to us for this conference, are the subject of much debate especially in those bar-rooms where economists meet. The reader should be warned at the outset that this paper does not pretend to settle the issue. It only sketches one answer, but we believe a largely correct one, to the ambitious questions assigned to us.

Keywords

Monetary Policy Central Bank Inflation Rate Money Supply International Reserve 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© International Economic Association 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hans Genberg
    • 1
  • Alexander K. Swoboda
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate Institute of International StudiesGenevaSwitzerland

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