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Critical Comment on the Forced Saving Thesis

  • John R. Presley

Abstract

It is not the objective of this chapter to question whether or not a government should allow a period of forced saving to develop. This question has been more than adequately discussed elsewhere.1 Here we are primarily concerned with the validity of the thesis itself. Can forced saving actually arise in a period of expansion?

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Consumer Good Capital Good Real Income Bank Loan Full Employment 
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Critical Comment on the Forced Saving Thesis

  1. 1.
    In the early classical literature see J. Bentham, Economic Writings, (ed. W. Stark), (London: Allen & Unwin for the Royal Economic Society, 1952), see especially Vol. 1, p. 237.Google Scholar
  2. See also for an excellent discussion B. Corry, op cit. pp. 55–61 and D. O’Brien, The Classical Economists, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1975) pp. 162–5.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    F. W. Taussig, Principles of Economics, 3rd Ed., (New York: Macmillan, 1939) Vol. I, p. 357. See also DHR, BPPL, p. 52.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    See especially R. G. Hawtrey, Capital and Employment, (Longmans, 1937) Ch. VIII.Google Scholar
  5. 13.
    J. Robinson, An Introduction to the Theory of Employment, (London: Macmillan, 1937) Ch. III.Google Scholar
  6. 15.
    S. Strigl, Kapital Und Produktion, (Vienna, 1934) p. 195.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© John R. Presley 1978

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  • John R. Presley

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