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Bolshevism Now

  • Philip Corrigan
  • Harvie Ramsay
  • Derek Sayer

Abstract

It is conventional to picture the death of Stalin in 1953 as marking a scission in Soviet history. Before, lie tyranny and purge. After, lie (relatively) greater humanism and liberalism, gradual moves towards détente with the West, and the acceptance of certain modes of organisation and policy formulation previously labelled as capitalist. For some interpreters, of course, these changes do indeed mark the victory of capitalism over Leninism in the Soviet Union. Bourgeois interpreters, preferring discretion, more often speak of an inevitable surrender by Soviet leaders to the universal imperatives of Development, kept distinct from any reference to the political system. There is a general belief on the part of these latter observers that the break with the past is characterised by a growth of pragmatism which has generated a series of forms of ‘de-Stalinisation’ and a consequent departure from Bolshevism.

Keywords

Foreign Policy Socialist Construction Socialist Country Capitalist Relation Class Struggle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Philip Corrigan, Harvie Ramsay and Derek Sayer 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip Corrigan
  • Harvie Ramsay
  • Derek Sayer

There are no affiliations available

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